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Kegels For Stress Urinary Incontinence

Katy was 35 when she started noticing the leaks. When she laughed at a joke a bit too hard, bent down to pick up her third baby, or tried to do jumping jacks at the gym, she’d feel it. Uncontrollable, and pretty embarrassing, she tried to brush it off as something that would eventually go away.

But the leaks didn’t stop, and started to grow more frequent as time went on. When her newborn finally turned one year old and she was still experiencing leaks, she decided to finally get help.

Katy went to see a physical therapist who gave her an examination and determined that her muscles had weakened from childbirth. She prescribed an exercise routine to help her firm up her core and pelvic floor muscles. One of the main ingredients? Kegels.

Stress Urinary Incontinence affects millions of American women and while it’s a common occurrence, it’s not a normal part of aging. The problem, associated with bladder leaks upon any type of strain or impact on the bladder (think running, jumping, sneezing, laughing) is often brushed under the rug, with women chalking it up to getting older. However, much can be done to reverse this problem if women take the time to strengthen their bodies. Often, the right exercises, such as kegels, can help alleviate symptoms – no pills or surgery needed.

Katy started doing the exercises prescribed by her doctor, and in a few months began to not only feel stronger, but noticed that her leaks had been smaller and much less frequent. After six months, they stopped completely.

For women looking to strengthen their pelvic floors, seeing a physical therapist is one of the best things you can do. Not only can they teach you which exercises to do, they can help show you how to do them.

Many women do kegels incorrectly, and it’s hard for them to know on their own which muscles to use when performing one. Physical therapists can help by using biofeedback during therapy, which lets women actually see how strong their contractions are.

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Another tool that can be used in conjunction with physical therapy are pelvic floor stimulators.  One example of this is INNOVO®, which was recently cleared by the FDA, and uses a pair of shorts to deliver gentle electrical pulses to the pelvic floor, aiding women in performing 180 perfect contractions every 30 minute session.  It’s an easy way to get your kegels in, while in the comfort of your own home, and is especially helpful when first starting out if a woman is not familiar with kegels or doesn’t know how to do them correctly.

INNOVO is available by prescription only, so talk with your Physical Therapist to see if it’s right for you.

Above all, no one should have to live with bladder leaks from stress urinary incontinenceMake an appointment with a woman’s health physical therapist and learn what you can do on your own to strengthen your body and get back to the life you love.


This post is sponsored by INNOVO®.

 INNOVO® is a first-in-class, wearable and truly non-invasive solution that treats the root cause of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) safely.

Utilizing its innovative Multipath® technology, INNOVO sends targeted and pain-free muscle stimulations through a pair of shorts via neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), to safely and effectively strengthen the muscles in the pelvic floor.

By adjusting the intensity on a hand-held controller, INNOVO delivers 180 perfect pelvic floor contractions (or pelvic floor exercises) per session. In as little as four weeks with regular use five days a week for 30 minutes, women experience significant improvements.

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