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Prolapse After Pregnancy – It’s Not Your Fault.

Around 6 weeks postpartum, I had expected to feel a bit more like myself.  I had avoided exploring anything in the vaginal area for fear of what I would find, but had felt a general heaviness since I had given birth.  Not knowing for sure if this was normal, I made an appointment with my doctor to get checked out.

Upon examination, my doctor confirmed that I had a prolapsed bladder.  His tone was nonchalant, as if it was totally normal and something that just happened sometimes.

I was completely shocked. What had gone wrong?  And why did I never hear that this was a possibility?  I immediately started blaming myself.  Why had I not done more kegels during my pregnancy?  Why didn’t I do more research to know that something like this could happen?  Did the decision to use a vacuum during the last bit of pushing influence this?  What could I have done to prevent this?

But the truth is, some women really are just more susceptible to prolapse.  While a prolapse can occur for many reasons, some women have more of a genetic risk for the condition due to the strength of the connective tissues.  It’s not your fault.

That being said, there are some things that may help you either avoid a prolapse, or at least improve your symptoms if you have one.

How to improve symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse

  • Maintain a normal weight. If you are overweight, you are more susceptible to a prolapse due to increased pressure inside the abdomen.

  • Avoid constipation. Becoming constipated can cause you to strain during bowel movements, increasing the chance of a prolapse. Ensure you are eating a high fiber diet and drink plenty of water every day.

  • Keep active. A regular exercise plan keeps your weight in check, and also helps promote healthy bowels. Be sure to include your pelvic muscles in your daily workout routine too.

  • Avoid extra pressure inside the abdomen. Things like lifting heavy objects, and chronic coughing, create persistent pressure, which can increase the likelihood of developing a prolapse, or making your symptoms worse if you have one. Stay healthy and avoid strenuous lifting.

Whatever you do though, don’t blame yourself for developing a prolapse.  Instead, use that energy to find out what you can do to improve your symptoms and treat the condition.  Talk to your doctor about your options, and find a qualified physical therapist to help you learn how to strengthen your muscles to improve symptoms.

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